A Recommended List of Deer & Rabbit Resistant Plants
(* = denotes xeriscape plants)
PERENNIALS
Moonshine Yarrow (Achillea ‘Moonshine’) *
Pink Yarrow (Achillea millefolium ‘Rosea’) *
Yellow Yarrow (Achillea filipendulina) *
Ajuga (Ajuga reptans)
Snow Drop Anemone (Anemone sylvestris) *
Kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) *
Sea Pink (Armeria maritime) *
Silver Mound Sage (Artemisia schmidtiana) *
Japanese Painted Fern (Athyrium f. x niponicum ‘Pictum’)
Basket of Gold (Aurinia saxatilis) *
Snow-in-Summer (Cerastium tomentosum) *
Shasta Daisy (Chrysanthemum maximum) *
Clematis (Clematis spp.)
Lily-of-the-Valley (Convallaria majalis)
Moonbeam Coreopsis (Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’) *
Zagreb Coreopsis (Coreopsis verticillata ‘Zagreb’) *
Black Knight Delphinium (Delphinium ' Pacific ‘Black Knight’)
Dwarf Butterfly Blue Delphinium (Delphinium grandiflorum ‘Butterfly Compacta’)
Dwarf Bleeding Heart (Dicentra x ‘Luxuriant’)
Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spectabilis)
Foxglove (Digitalis spp.)
Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas ‘Undulata Robusta’)
Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) *
Cushion Spurge (Euphorbia polychrome) *
English Ivy (Hedera helix)
Daylily (Hemerocallis spp.) *
Golden Tiara Hosta (Hosta fortunei ‘Golden Tiara’)
Blue Giant Hosta (Hosta sieboldiana ‘Elegans’)
Frances Williams Hosta (Hosta sieboldiana ‘Frances Williams’)
Japanese Iris (Iris ensata)
German Bearded Iris (Iris germanica var.) *
Variegated Iris (Iris pallida ‘Variegata’)
Siberian Iris (Iris sibirica)
English Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia ‘Munstead’) *
Blue Flax (Linum perenne) *
Lupine (Lupinus spp.)
Creeping Oregon Grape Holly (Mahonia repens) *
Peony (Paeonia lactiflora)
Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule)
Engleman Ivy (Virginia Creeper) (Parthenocissus quinquefolia engelmannii) *
Penstemon (Penstemon spp.) *
Creeping Phlox (Phlox subulata) *
Jacob’s Ladder (Polemonium caeruleum)
Mexican Hat (Ratibida columnifera ‘Red’) *
Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’)
Silver Sage Salvia (Salvia argentea) *
Purple Flowering Sage (Salvia nemorosa) *
May Night Salvia (Salvia sylvestris x ‘Mainacht’) * Lavender Cotton (Santolina chamaecyphrissus) *
Soapwort (Saponaria ocymoides) *
Gold Moss Sedum (Sedum floriferum) *
Stone crop Sedum (Sedum hybridum) *
Blue Spruce Sedum (Sedum pinifolium ‘Blue Spruce’) *
Autumn Joy Sedum (Sedum spectabile ‘Autumn Joy’) *
Dragon’s Blood Sedum (Sedum spurium ‘Dragon’s Blood’) *
Elfin Thyme (Thymus spp.)
Lemon Thyme (Thymus serpyllum citroides ) *
Wooly Thyme (Thymus praecox pseudolanuginosus) *
Periwinkle (Vinca minor ‘Bowles’)
Hummingbird Flower (Zauschneria garrettii) *
ORNAMENTAL GRASSES
Feather Reed Grass (Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’)
Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium)
Pampas Grass (Erianthus ravennae)
Blue Fescue (Festuca glauca ‘Elijah Blue’) *
Blue Avena Oat Grass (Helictotrichon sempervirens) *
Blood Grass (Imperata cylindrica ‘Rubra’)
Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Gracillimus’)
Purple Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Purpurescens’)
Variegated Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis variegates)
Dwarf Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku Jima’)
Zebra Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Zebrinus’)
Hardy Fountain Grass (Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’) *


American bittersweet
amsonia
anemones
angelica
astilbe
avens
baby's breath
balloon flower
barrenwort
basket-of-gold
bittersweet
beebalm
bergenia
bishop's weed
bleeding heart
boltonia
bugbane
bugleweed
buttercup
butterfly bush
candytuft
Christmas fern
cinnamon fern
cinquefoil
clematis
columbine
coreopsis
crown imperial
daffodil
dead nettle
evening primrose
false indigo

Perennials
feverfew
forget-me-not
garlic chives
gas plant
globe thistle
goatsbeard
goldenrod
hay-scented fern
heath
heather
hellebore
Hungarian speedwell
interrupted fern
Jack-in-the-pulpit
Jacob's ladder
Japanese pachysandra
Joe-pye weed
knapweed
kirengeshoma
labrador violet
lamb's ear
lavender
lily-of-the-valley
lupine
lungwort
Mexican bush sage
mint
mullein
New York fern
oregano
ornamental onion
ostrich fern
oriental poppy
painted daisy
partridgeberry
pennyroyal
perennial blue flax
plumbago
primrose
purple coneflower
queen-of-the-prairie
rhubarb
ribbon grass
rosemary
oyal fern
sage
scilla
sensitive fern
shasta daisy
soapwort
spike gayfeather
statice
sundrops
sweet cicely
sweet William
sweet woodruff
tiger lily
toadflax
turtlehead
tussock bellflower
wormwood
yarrow
yucca

 


DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
Tall Western Sage (Artemisia tridentata) *
Mentor Barberry (Berberis x mentorensis)
Red Barberry (Berberis thunbergii ‘Atropurpurea’)
Crimson Pygmy Barberry (Berberis thunbergii ‘Atropurpurea Nana’) *
Golden Barberry (Berberis thunbergii ‘Aurea’)
Golden Nugget Barberry (Berberis thunbergii ‘Monlers’)
Rosy Glow Barberry (Berberis thunbergii ‘Rosy Glow’)
Green Barberry (Berberis thunbergii)
Butterfly Bush (Buddleia davidii)
Blue Mist Spirea (Caryopteris x clandonensis) *
Curl Leaf Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus ledifolius) *
Red Flowering Quince (Chaenomeles japonica)
Fernbush (Chamaebatiara millefolium) *
Rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) *
Red Twig Dogwood (Cornus sericea “Baileyi’)
Cardinal Dogwood (Cornus sericea ‘Cardinal’)
Purple Smoke Tree (Cotinus coggygria)
Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus)
Dwarf Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus ‘Compacta’)
Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa) *
Rose-of-Sharon (Althea) (Hibiscus syriacus)
St. Johnswort (Hypericum kalmianum var.) *
Cheyenne Privet (Ligustrum vulgare ‘Cheyenne’) *
Arnold Red Honeysuckle (Lonicera tatarica ‘Arnold Red’) *
Russian Sage (Perovskia artiplicifolia) *                    Potentilla (Potentilla spp.)
Nanking Cherry (Prunus tomentosa)
Gambel Oak (Quercus gambelii) *
Alpine Current (Ribes alpinum)
Yellow Flowering Current (Ribes aureum) *
Pixwell Gooseberry (Ribes hirtellum pixwell)
Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica) *
Gro-Low Sumac (Rhus aromatica ‘Gro-Low’) *
Smooth Sumac (Rhus glabra) *
Cutleaf Sumac (Rhus glabra ‘Laciniata’) *
Three Leaf Sumac (Rhus trilobata) *
Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) *
Boulder Raspberry (Rubus delicious) *
Anthony Waterer Spirea (Spirea japonica ‘Anthony Waterer)
VanHoutte Spirea (Spiraea x vanhouttei) *
Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus)
Hancock Coral berry (Symphoricarpus x chenault ‘Hancock’) *
Chinese Lilac (Syringa x chinensis)
Korean Dwarf Lilac (Syringa meyeri)
Miss Kim Lilac (Syringa patula ‘Miss Kim’)
Persian Lilac (Syringa x persica)
Common Purple Lilac (Syringa vulgaris) *
Common White Lilac (Syringa vulgaris alba) *
Korean Spice Viburnum (Viburnum carlesii)
Wayfaring Viburnum (Viburnum lantana) *
Mohican Viburnum (Viburnum lantana ‘Mohican’) *
Alleghany Viburnum (Viburnum x rhytidophylloides ‘Alleghany’)
BROADLEAF EVERGREENS & SPECIALTY EVERGREENS
Spanish Gold Broom (Cytisus purgan ‘Spanish Gold’) *
Moonlight Broom (Cytisus scoparius ‘Moonlight’) *
Holly (Ilex x meserveae)
Oregon Grape Holly (Mahonia aquifolium) *
Pyracantha (Pyracantha spp.)
Yucca (Yucca spp.) *
ALL VARIETIES OF JUNIPERS
EVERGREEN TREES
Concolor Fir (Abies concolor)
Colorado Spruce (Picea pungens) *
Pinyon Pine (Pinus edulis) *
Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) *
DECIDUOUS TREES
Common Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) *
Imperial Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis ‘Impcole’ Imperial®) *
Shademaster Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis ‘PNI2835’ Shademaster®)*
Skyline Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis ‘Skycole’ Skyline®) *

Annuals and biennials


ageratum
blanket flower
blue salvia
cleome
dahlia
dusty miller
edging lobelia
forget-me-not
four O'clock
heliotrope
marigold
morning glory
parsley
polka-dot plant
poppy
snapdragon
sweet alyssum
sweet basil
thorn apple
verbena
wax begonia
zonal geranium


Shrubs


barberry (Berberis spp.)
common barberry (Berberis vulgaris)
common boxwood (Buxus sempervirens)
Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia)
forsythia (Forsythia spp.)
English hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata)
beautybush (Kolkwitzia amabilis)
mugo pine (Pinus mugo)
common lilac (Syringa vulgaris)
redosier dogwood (Cornus sericea)
Trees
Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens)
European white birch (Betula pendula)
paper birch (Betula papyrifera)
Honeylocust (Gleditsia triacanthos)
Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis)
Norway spruce (Picea abies)
white spruce (Picea glauca)
Austrian pine (Pinus nigra)
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

=corkscrew willow (Salix matsudana tortuosa)


Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda)


 

HOLLY ACRES TREE NURSERY AND GARDEN CENTER

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Deer damage to trees is most often the result of males rubbing and scraping their antlers against the tree, causing significant damage. This is done to remove the velvet. Once the velvet is removed, deer may continue to polish their antlers by rubbing up and down the trunk. Deer also rub trees during mating season to attract females and mark their territory, warning other males to stay away. This can result in broken branches and torn tree bark.Damaged trees, especially young ones, cannot transport nutrients or water, which is vital for the tree's survival. In addition to rubbing trees, deer may also paw at the soil around them as well as urinate on the area. They will chew on branches too; however this is easily controlled by pruning lower branches.

 

 

Plantskydd Liquid & Powder Concentrate
Keeping Deer Away From Trees

 

Since deer usually return to the same location, it is important to know how to protect trees from deer, especially if the trees have previously been damaged. There are several options for keeping deer away from trees. The most effective is to surround the tree with fencing or other suitable barriers to offer deer rub tree protection.

  The use of deer repellents can also be used for keeping deer away from trees. A common method for landscapers when they plant Aspen trees is to surround them with cobblestone which deter the deer because they are not sure footed, they then wrap the tree and use deer repellent. Combining these metheds can be very effective. A dog does a fine job, and people with outdoor dogs don't usually have this problem.

  Fencing is a must for vegetable gardens!

 

Protect Trees from Deer with Repellents

  Pick up Plantskydd at Holly Acres
This is how we keep the deer at bay!


Deer repellents can offer a solution. Repellents may be either contact or area. Contact repellents taste bad to deer. When using a contact repellent, the tree should be treated up to six feet. Applying contact repellents on the tree should prevent chewing; however, it may not stop rubbing of its antlers. Area repellents emit foul odors, which can deter deer from the general area. This type of deer repellent may be more effective for deer rub tree protection. Both wash off with rain and need to be reapplied regularly.

  After many trials with area customers, we have found the most effective deer repellent to be Plantskydd. It is odorless after it dries, and doesn't need to be reapplied as often. It is made of bloodmeal so it acts as a fertilizer too. It comes in a spray or powdered form and the powdered form seems to be even more effective.

We have also discovered what doesn't work. Soap! Windmills! Mothballs! Garlic! Home made Rotten egg mixtures!

 

OH DEER!!!